Stawell Crazy Day Sale 2018: Bargain-hunters and their kids to join in the fun of mystery object hunt

MYSTERY OBJECT: Join in the fun as shoppers try to locate and name this mystery object. No clues offered... but the photo was taken at an iconic venue in Stawell.
MYSTERY OBJECT: Join in the fun as shoppers try to locate and name this mystery object. No clues offered... but the photo was taken at an iconic venue in Stawell.

Stawell bargain-hunters will have even more fun on Friday at the Crazy Day Sale, with a mystery object hunt for the kids also taking place.

Kids will try to locate and name this mystery object (shown above). No clues are being offered, but the photo was taken at an iconic Stawell venue. Prizes will be in participating stores if they can tell the shopkeeper where the photo was taken.

The Stawell Times-News, together with Stawell Biz, is pleased to be running the annual Crazy Day retail event! Crazy Day means crazy sales!

Plus! Enter at participating stores for your chance to win a $250 shopping voucher (terms and conditions apply).

DID YOU KNOW?

Marble and the statues sculptors and stonemasons make from it, has a proud history. As far back as Aristotle’s day, and Michaelangelo’s ‘agony and ecstasy’, the cool, smooth properties of mostly Italian marble has been the preferred medium.

In those times, people wrestled with the problem of not only transporting the marble from the quarries, but the packing and delivery of the marble statues the artisans produced.

Two drachmas per rower per day, and 10 rowers minimum, plus the captain, to deliver the statue over three days was the going rate in Aristotle’s day. 

Harcourt granite was the obvious choice for our early Australian sculptors and stonemasons.

It was local, plentiful and long lasting, used not only for statues, but huge blocks were transported from Harcourt to be used in many of Melbourne’s great buildings in the 1800s.

The War Memorials in Main Street, are important commemorative sculptures to the soldiers who fought and died in wars during the 20th century. MORE BELOW

The Soldiers' Memorial - which is dedicated to those who fought and died in the First World War - was unveiled in 1923, having been erected by George Robson, monumental mason of Stawell.

The Australian soldier figure sculpture was sculpted in Italy. The second War Memorial was constructed in the late 20th century.

The memorial has a Harcourt granite base with the sides of polished traclyte, three granite steps, polished traclyte neck (with inscription), and an Australian soldier figure sculpture in full kit, standing with arms reversed.

The second War Memorial also demonstrates important visual qualities that include the triangular flower plot, granite coffin-like form and circular head piece adorned with a spherical, polish granite sculpture representing the planet Earth.

The War Memorials are associated with those who fought and died in the First and Second World Wars, and the wars in Borneo, Korea, Malaya and Vietnam.

The Soldiers' Memorial, unveiled in 1923, is associated with the Stawell Girls' Remembrance League, which formed during World War One and who raised the funds for the Memorial.