Snow falls in the Grampians

Five months after fire devastated large swathes of the Grampians National Park, nature has come full circle.

Bert Sprague is pictured enjoying the snow on top of Mount William in the Grampians.

Bert Sprague is pictured enjoying the snow on top of Mount William in the Grampians.

Predictions of snowfalls down to 700 metres in Victoria early on Tuesday meant it was always a possibility at the highest parts of the Grampians.

And snow there was.

By 9.30am, rain and slightly warmer weather had melted most snow at Mt William, which at 1167m, is the highest peak in the Grampians.

However, there was still plenty of snow around. Hidden in gullies, sheltered under logs and anywhere protected from the driving rain of Tuesday morning.

A few cars arrived shortly after, as sightseers set-off for the final climb to the summit, not satisfied with the small patches of snow in the car park.

They were there to see more than just snow.

They were there to witness the true wonder and rugged beauty of these hills, the very last vestige of the Great Dividing Range.

Cascading waterfalls poured from just about every slope as the night's rain - and perhaps some melting snow - was washed away down some incredible rock formations.

The morning sun peaked out from behind dark stormy clouds at one point, creating a sparkle across the amazing landscape.

The noise in the tree tops from the ferocious wind was deafening and the rain, sleet and light snowfalls made life less than comfortable.

For those who decided to push up the hill on foot, there was no question.

"Mate, you've just got to have a look," one sightseer said.

It's this attitude and the pride people living nearby have for the Grampians that attracts so many back to this part of the world.

Nature has come full circle. It has soothed the Grampians' January burns with an icy remedy.

Snow has replaced fire - and the Grampians are better than ever.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop