The Wildlife Art Museum of Australia is lobbying for funding from the state government

CREATIVE: One of the Wildlife Art Museum of Australia's afternoon nature play sessions. Picture: Anthony Piovesan
CREATIVE: One of the Wildlife Art Museum of Australia's afternoon nature play sessions. Picture: Anthony Piovesan

THE Wildlife Art Museum of Australia project is yet to obtain state government funding. 

The project’s vision is to create a nature, arts and learning focused centre in between Halls Gap and Pomonal. 

The project’s site is located near Halls Gap Zoo.

The museum’s marketing co-ordinator Ange Turrell said the project was ambitious.

“The project is going to be as big as any art gallery and botanical garden in Australia,” she said. 

Ms Turrell said the art gallery would consist of visiting art collections of various themes. 

She said the project had the support of numerous organisations including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Royal Botanical Garden, Museums Victoria among other organisations. 

“Our number one priority for the project is to get state government funding,” Ms Turrell said.

“We are seriously lobbying state politicians, local government, leaders of regional partnership groups and other regional partnership groups and tourism organisations. 

“We are also starting a serious philanthropic campaign.” 

The project is expected to cost $27.4 million.

The museum’s current funding model is based on obtaining $10 million in funding from the state government, $10 million from the federal government and $7.4 million in private funding. 

Ms Turrell said the project would be self-sufficient in funding, after the initial funding to establish the museum and garden. 

The museum has had two feasibility studies, an economic benefits study and have just had their operating budget redone for the project.

“We used consultants recommended by the government,” Ms Turrell said. 

The studies found the project would provide an economic benefit of $135 million in 10 years’ time.

In 25 years’ time the economic benefit is expected to be $601 million.

“This is a humble estimate,” Ms Turrell said. 

“We need this to be a regional priority in the upcoming state election.”