Project Platypus outlines 2017 plans to improve land management | PHOTOS

Plantout volunteer Tim Inkster gets ready to plant a seedling at a 2016 Project Platypus event. The team is planning more events to improve land management.

Plantout volunteer Tim Inkster gets ready to plant a seedling at a 2016 Project Platypus event. The team is planning more events to improve land management.

Revegetation works, weed and rabbit control and management of over 30 funded grants will be a part of Project Platypus’ 2017 plans. 

New Project Platypus manager Abi Smith moved into the region with her partner and young daughter last year and said she was looking forward to building on the many achievements made by Project Platypus over the years.

“I am proud to be working with the Project Platypus team and to be a part of the amazing Landcare network in the region,” she said. “Project Platypus plays an important role working across public and private land to improve land health and biodiversity across the region.”

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Ms Smith worked as a wildlife ecologist on Norfolk Island, protecting threatened species, in her last role.  

“Every year, as part of its revegetation program, Project Platypus runs Plantout events, with hundreds of volunteers participating in tree planting on local properties, planting thousands of trees to restore habitat and protect waterways,” she said. 

“This year we have 16 properties participating in our revegetation program and around mid-year we will be calling out for volunteers for the 2017 Plantout event.”

Project Platypus was also ramping up its weed and rabbit-control program.

Ms Smith said this was an increasingly important part of land management.

“This is a great opportunity for the public to manage their weeds and rabbits,” she said.

“Just contact Project Platypus for an assessment and quote and we get the job done quickly and efficiently.

“Due to demand in the region, it’s an area in which we are building our capability and we are keen to expand our work in the region.”

Project Platypus is a not-for-profit Landcare network for the Upper Wimmera Catchment.

The network has provided a range of services and support to the Landcare community since operations were established in 1994.

An estimated 10 million dollars has been brought into the region by Project Platypus over 22 years of production in the district. 

This has resulted in many hectares of invasive pest management, re-vegetation and bio-link creation and erosion control.

I am proud to be working with the Project Platypus team and to be a part of the amazing Landcare network in the region. - Abi Smith

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