WAMA project announces plans to house nationally endangered animal species

FAUNA: project board members Mike Stevens and John Hawkins discuss the predator proof fence plans for the site.
FAUNA: project board members Mike Stevens and John Hawkins discuss the predator proof fence plans for the site.

The Wildlife Art Museum of Australia project unearthed plans to house and nurture the nationally endangered southern brown bandicoot and the long nose potoroo. 

The project’s newest board member, Mike Stevens, was brought on to strengthen WAMA’s capacity to contribute to the conservation of threatened animal species in the Grampians region. 

“In the past, these animals were part of the Australian landscape, but are now so rare,” he said.

“Most Australians would not be able to identify them or know they play a critical missing role turning over soil to maintain many ecosystems.”

The WAMA team will partner with Halls Gap Zoo and government agencies to house the animals in a sanctuary on the proposed site at Pomonal. 

A 1.8-metre high fence will also be installed around the site to protect them from predators such as foxes and feral cats.

"I am excited that WAMA is hoping to not only showcase world-class wildlife art, but to have some of Australia's unique wildlife at the site,” Mr Stevens said.